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Beginner's guide to writing case reports

Written by Seema Biswas. Posted in Research

notepad-penFor most junior doctors their first experience of publication will be writing a case report. BMJ Case Reports Editor-in-Chief, Seema Biswas, offers some advice on perfecting your write-up.

Writing up a memorable case with your team is a valuable learning experience. It is the opportunity to research more about a case, search the medical literature, look up and compare clinical guidelines, ask probing questions about the pros and cons of management decisions and, most of all, assert your point of view in the medical literature.

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Setting up a national workshop as an anaesthetic trainee

Written by Jason Lie. Posted in Careers

ituIt is essential for senior trainees to demonstrate their abilities at leadership and management in order to obtain a Certificate of Completion of Training[1] and get shortlisted for a consultant job. Setting up a workshop would provide a perfect platform for me to demonstrate these qualities, to show my enthusiasm to teach and at the same time to improve patient's safety.

 

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Learning to lead

Written by JuniorDr. Posted in Careers

As a junior doctor you can develop your leadership competencies by being proactive and consciously assuming greater responsibilities around leadership activities; the Medical Leadership Competency Framework provides a range of practical examples of opportunities for learning and development.

Clinical training might include a higher degree in a subject allied to medicine and might also count towards your certificate of completion of training (CCT). In the past, these have included leadership positions, vocational or academic qualifications and overseas posts that are not part of an approved programme. OoPTs require prospective approval from the General Medical Council (GMC) and candidates can retain their national training numbers during this period.

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All at sea - a ships doctor

Written by Philip Brooks. Posted in Careers

I started on a fairly typical career path after qualification from the University of Leicester in 2001. I rotated through SHO posts in a variety of different specialities relevant to Emergency Medicine, my then career choice.

Just as ‘Modernizing Medical Careers’ was being introduced in 2006 I was working as an A&E middle-grade in Manchester and studying for my membership to the College of Emergency Medicine (MCEM) exams. Once I had the exam I basically had two choices - apply for one of the last few ‘old-style’ SpR posts in emergency medicine or try something different. I chose the latter and applied for the position of ship’s doctor, having heard about the job from an old medical school friend who was presently working for the company and loving the experience.

 

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So you want to be a palliative care physician?

Written by Yasmin Akram. Posted in Careers

general practiceThe world health organisation defines palliative care as "an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual."

In the hospital and acute setting palliative care physicians work with teams of specialist palliative care nurses. Their role is to advise nursing and medical teams on complex symptom control, psychological and spiritual issues for people with life limiting illnesses.

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